A lot of people had one question on their minds during their Wednesday morning commute in the freezing rain.

Just why did the state DOT not treat the roads prior to the freezing rain that caused extremely slippery conditions, dozens of accidents, and schools to decide to close midway through the morning commute?

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Well the Connecticut Department of Transportation did issue a number of different reasons in response to this question.

According to the DOT's Instagram post, this freezing rain event was the "perfect storm", and freezing rain is not like snow and ice, so the main reason they gave for the roads not being treated was it was too cold. The liquid treatment used by the state to treat roads prior to a snow or ice event will freeze when the temps are too cold and can cause dangerous driving conditions before any precipitation even falls.


According to the National Weather Service portions of southern Connecticut were hit the worst, causing very slippery sidewalks, roads and bridges.

Many school officials in Fairfield County blame the timing of the storm for the confusion in getting the word out about the status of schools. Apparently the Superintendents who make the call on delays and closings didn't know about the possibility of icy conditions until the buses were already out on their routes picking up students.

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