They thought it was their grandson calling asking for financial assistance.

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It was an early morning phone call from some guy who identified himself as Elaine and Joseph Lyon's grandson. Instead, it was an imposter trying to scam the elderly couple, according to an article on ctinsider.com.

Most parents and grandparents would do just about anything for their kids and grandkids. Elaine and Joseph believed it was their grandson who told them he was in jail after being in a car accident in Maryland with a woman who was almost three months pregnant.

This despicable human being then told the Lyonses to call this 'lawyer" whose name and number he provided. When they did reach this so-called attorney, he reportedly explained to the couple that their "grandson" could serve some serious jail time if this "pregnant" woman lost the baby.

But first, the "lawyer" explained their grandson would need $7,500 for bail money. They ended up giving $7,500 in cash to a courier, and not surprisingly, the fake attorney was nowhere to be found. Check out this video to find out how these scammers work and what to look for:

Getting involved with this story, I remembered back about five years ago; I received a message in my voicemail from someone who identified himself as an IRS agent, who told me I would be arrested and my home would be seized if I didn't call him back within a specific time frame. The caller sounded legit, and I thought I was in big trouble until I Googled the number, which had already been flagged as a flagrant scammer.

Elaine and Joseph had become victims of what's known as the "Grandparent's Scam." Elaine told police the scammers had made the story sound so genuine that she didn't have any reason to doubt them.

Scammers have become experts at utilizing their specialized techniques to make themselves sound legitimate. There are a variety of ways to check first before sending any money. The very first thing you should do is resist the urge to act immediately and then click on consumer.ftc.gov/articles.