I'm sure you've heard the expression "into each life some rain must fall", well apparently the person who first said that never lived in Connecticut.

If they had then the expression may have changed to "in each life, you're going to get rained on every day."

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Once again this week, we start things off with more heavy rain and thunderstorms, and the National Weather Service has us under a flash flood watch until 10 AM on Tuesday.

Heavy rain and thunderstorms are expected to fire up again by later this afternoon and continue through the day tomorrow as a warm front approaches. The storms could produce between 1-3 inches of rain with some areas seeing as much as 4 inches.

The rain couldn't come at a worse time as local areas have already been inundated with heavy rain last week thanks to Tropical Storm Elsa. Flood prone areas and low lying communities are at the greatest risk for flooding, as well as areas near rivers and streams that are near or already above flood stage.

The flash flood watch also applies to some counties in southeastern New York and that means that conditions could be right to cause some flooding in these areas that are not normally affected.

Here's what the National Weather Service says we can expect for today and the first part of the week:

  • Today: A chance of showers, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 2pm. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds and heavy rain. Cloudy, with a high near 77.
  • Tonight: Showers and thunderstorms likely before 1am, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm after 1am. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds and heavy rain, with a low around 67.
  • Tomorrow: A chance of showers, with thunderstorms also possible after 4pm. Otherwise, cloudy, with a high near 78.
  • Tomorrow Night: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, with a low around 67.
  • Wednesday: A slight chance of showers, then showers and thunderstorms likely after 9am. with a high near 84.

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